Grants Program

Research Grantees 2016-2017

Post-Doctoral Summer Research Grant
Ayten Kılıç
University of Wisconsin-Madison

"Paved with Good Intentions: The Road to the 1877-78 Russo-Ottoman War; Great Power Diplomacy and Ideology."

Dr. Ayten Kılıç was born and raised in Shumen, Bulgaria. She holds a BA from the Dept. of International Relations at Middle Eastern Technical University (METU) and an MA from Bilkent University's Department of International Relations. Dr. Kılıç studied Ottoman and Russian history under the guidance of Prof. Kemal Karpat and Prof. David McDonald at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's History Department where she is currently an Honorary Fellow and where she is working on turning her dissertation,"Paved with Good Intentions: the Road to the 1877-78 Russo-Ottoman War; Great Power Diplomacy and Ideology," into a book manuscript. Her research areas include but are not limited to the diplomatic histories of the Ottoman and Russian Empires in the ninteenth century, Great Power conflict and ideology, and nationalism in the Ottoman Balkans. In her research she benefits from reading the Ottoman script as well as Bulgarian, Russian, Turkish, French and other Slavic languages.
Heath W. Lowry Distinguished Dissertation Writing Fellowship
Alexander Erich Balistreri
Princeton University

"Creating Nations and States on the Turkish-Caucasian Border, 1850-1950"

Alexander E. Balistreri studied Political Science and Turkish Studies in Wisconsin, Princeton, and İstanbul before starting his Ph.D. at Princeton University's Department of Near Eastern Studies in 2011. His dissertation examines state- and nation-building in the Turkish-Caucasian borderland region through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Between 2014-2015, Balistreri was a doctoral fellow at the German Orient-Institut in İstanbul. His article on political opposition in the early Turkish Republic, published in Die Welt des Islams, was awarded Brill Publishers' first Middle East and Islamic Studies Early-Career Paper Prize in 2015.
Dissertation Writing Grants
Patrick John Adamiak
University of California, San Diego

"To the Edge of the Desert: Settlement, Civilization, and Caucasian Refugees in the Late Ottoman Empire (1878-1918)"

Patrick John Adamiak is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at the University of California, San Diego working on my dissertation, entitled "To the Edge of the Desert: Settlement, Civilization, and Caucasian Refugees in the late Ottoman Empire (1878-1918)." His study analyzes the settlement of refugees at the desert fringe of the empire in Southern Syria, Eastern Libya, and Upper Mesopotamia. Historians have typically overlooked the significance of the settlements because these areas ended up in different nation-states after World War I. In particular, they have neglected the settlements as part of a trans-regional imperial project to extend sedentary life into semi-arid zones at the expense of pastoral populations. With the support of the Institute of Turkish Studies, he will be able to focus solely on completing my dissertation.
Zoe Ann Griffith
Brown University

"Roots of Wealth, Routes of Empire: Private Capital and Imperial Governance in the Ottoman Eighteenth-Century"

Zoe Griffith is a doctoral candidate in History at Brown University whose work focuses on the social, economic, and legal history of the Ottoman Empire alongside global approaches to early modernity. From 2013-2015, she conducted archival fieldwork in Egypt, Turkey, and France with the support of the Fulbright-Hays, the Social Science Research Council, and the American Research Center in Egypt. With the support of the Institute for Turkish Studies, she will complete a dissertation on the political economic and administrative networks linking Egypt's Mediterranean port cities to imperial and regional markets around the turn of the nineteenth century.
Faisal H. Husain
Georgetown University

"Ottoman Rivers: The Tigris and Euphrates, 1514-1831"

Faisal Husain is a Ph.D. candidate at Georgetown University's Department of History and currently serves on the editorial board of Global Environment. His dissertation, "Ottoman Rivers: The Tigris and Euphrates, 1514-1831," examines the establishment of a unified Ottoman imperial regime over the entirety of the Tigris and Euphrates flow in the early sixteenth century and the consequences of this dramatic political transition on the state, riparian communities, and the environment. His articles related to the topic have appeared in Environmental History and Journal of Interdisciplinary History. The generous support from the Institute of Turkish Studies Dissertation Writing Grant will allow Faisal to devote his time to completing the writing of his dissertation.
Jeanene Mae Mitchell
University of Washington

"At the Confluence of Transnational and Local Actors: Transboundary River Management in the Kura Basin"

Jeanene Mitchell is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Interdisciplinary Program in Near and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle. With the support of an ITS Dissertation Writing Grant, she will complete her dissertation, titled "At the Confluence of Transnational and Local Actors: Transboundary River Management in the Kura Basin." Using the Kura river basin of Turkey, Georgia and Azerbaijan as a case study, her work explains how development-funded projects in transboundary water management attempt to integrate transnational, national and local actors in project implementation. Jeanene's interests in Turkish studies include Turkey's resource management and regional cooperation. Her theoretical approach to her dissertation draws upon state-society relations and the intersection between comparative political science and critical development studies. Using an ethnographic methodology, her research sheds light on the role of knowledge brokers in resource management across different levels and types of state, societal, and development-community actors.
James Ryan
University of Pennsylvania

"The Republic of Others: Opponents of Kemalism in Turkey's Single Party Era, 1919-1950"

James Ryan is a Doctoral Candidate in the Department of History at the University of Pennsylvania. With the help of a Dissertation Award from ITS, he will be working towards finishing his dissertation, "The Republic of Others: Opponents of Kemalism in Turkey's Single Party Era, 1919-1950" in the 2016-17 Academic Year. This dissertation considers what it meant to live, write, and think in Turkey in opposition to the Kemalist single-party state from its beginnings until the election of the Democrat Party in 1950. It examines the lives of several prominent opposition intellectuals who made significant contributions to the Turkish intellectual life, how they conflicted with Kemalist orthodoxy, and what the consequences of that conflict were for the development of the Turkish public sphere. Research for this dissertation was conducted in state archives in İstanbul, Ankara, and Washington, DC, as well as major libraries and private archives in Turkey and the United States.

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Mark Pinson Grant for Graduate Research on the Ottoman Balkans Fellowship
Fredrick Walter Lorenz
University of California, Los Angeles

"Relocating Balkan Muslims to Anatolia: Local Agency in Transforming Ottoman State Policy, 1878-1923"

Fredrick Walter Lorenz is a Ph.D. student in the Department of History at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research project offers a historical analysis of migration and state shaping in the late Ottoman Empire from 1878 to 1923. His project focuses on the political and social effects of the large-scale movement and resettlement of refugees from the Balkans into Anatolia and Arab provinces under Ottoman rule. The Mark Pinson Grant for Graduate Research on the Ottoman Balkans will support his archival research in İstanbul where he will acquire necessary primary sources from the Başbakanlık Ottoman archives and other libraries.

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Grants for the Publication of Scholarly Books and Journals
Elisabeth A. Fraser
University of South Florida

"Mediterranean Encounters: Artists Between Europe and the Ottoman Empire, 1774-1839"
Kemal Karpat
University of Wisconsin-Madison

"International Journal of Turkish Studies"
Kent F. Schull
Kent Schull (Binghamton University (SUNY))

"The Journal of Ottoman and Turkish Studies"

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